2017 CTAS (Coordinated Tribal Assistance Solicitation) Now Open

The Department of Justice today announced the opening of the grant solicitation period for comprehensive funding to American Indian and Alaska Native tribal governments and tribal consortia to support public safety, victim services and crime prevention.  The department’s Fiscal Year (FY) 2017 Coordinated Tribal Assistance Solicitation (CTAS) posts today at https://www.justice.gov/tribal/open-solicitations.

“The CTAS program is a cornerstone of the Justice Department’s partnership with sovereign tribal nations,” said Attorney General Loretta E. Lynch.  “By providing tribes and villages with critical funding for everything from law enforcement equipment to programs for native youth and victims of crime, the CTAS program gives tribes the resources they need to address the particular challenges they face.  I encourage tribes and villages to take advantage of this program, and I look forward to continuing our work with our tribal partners to build stronger and safer communities for all.”

The Department of Justice launched CTAS in FY 2010 in direct response to concerns raised by tribal leaders about the department’s grant process that did not provide the flexibility tribes needed to address their criminal justice and public safety needs.  The department designed this comprehensive approach to save time and resources and allow tribes and the department to gain a better understanding of the tribes’ overall public safety needs.

The department’s Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS), Office on Violence Against Women (OVW) and the Office of Justice Programs (OJP), specifically OJP’s Bureau of Justice Assistance (BJA), Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) and Office for Victims of Crime (OVC) all award funding under CTAS. The funding can be used to enhance law enforcement, bolster adult and juvenile justice systems, prevent and control juvenile delinquency, serve native victims of crime and support other efforts to combat crime.

Grantees submit applications for CTAS online through DOJ’s Grants Management System (GMS).  Applicants must register with GMS at https://grants.ojp.usdoj.gov/gmsexternal/ prior to submitting an application.  The application deadline is 9:00 p.m. Eastern Standard Time (EST), Feb. 28, 2017.  Applicants are strongly urged to apply in advance of the deadline.

For the FY 2017 CTAS, a tribe or tribal consortium will submit a single application and select from any or all of the nine competitive grant programs referred to as “purpose areas.”  This approach allows the department’s grant-making components to consider the totality of a tribal nation’s overall public safety needs.

The nine purpose areas (PA) are:

PA1 – Public Safety and Community Policing (COPS)PA2 – Comprehensive Tribal Justice Systems Strategic Planning (BJA)PA3 – Justice Systems and Alcohol and Substance Abuse (BJA)PA4 – Corrections and Correctional Alternatives (BJA)PA5 – Violence Against Women Tribal Governments Program (OVW)PA6 – Victims of Crime: Children’s Justice Act Partnerships for Indian Communities (OVC)PA7 – Victims of Crime: Comprehensive Victim Assistance (OVC)PA8 – Juvenile Healing to Wellness Courts (OJJDP)PA9 – Tribal Youth Program (OJJDP)

Tribes or tribal consortia may also be eligible for non-tribal specific federal grant programs and are encouraged to explore these other funding opportunities.  Additional funding information may be found at the department’s Tribal Justice and Safety website at www.justice.gov/tribal or the www.grants.gov.

Today’s announcement is part of the department’s ongoing initiative to increase engagement, coordination and action on public safety in tribal communities.


OVC TTAC Resource Library Now Available!

Visit the new Resource Library, a searchable collection of tools, promotional items, reference materials, and more that you can use for your organization’s development and training needs.

Find the most useful resources in this evolving Library

From advocacy to self-care, search by resource type. Each resource includes a summary to make it easy for you to find the right tools to meet your needs.

Find materials tailored to educators, organizations, practitioners, or program managers.

Search for resources to help you better respond to victims with disabilities, child victims, and other populations.

Looking for materials from a specific curriculum or training? The Resource Library has materials from more than 25 training sources, such as Strategic Planning for Victim Service Leaders and Identifying and Responding to Elder Abuse.

Are you conducting a training on Sexual Assault Nurse Examiners (SANE) programs and would like your attendees to learn about the new SANE Program Development and Operation Guide? Download the flier to share. The Resource Library has this and a variety of other promotional items you can use to let others know about available resources.

Find the resources you need when you need them. Visit the Resource Library today!


National Institute on the Prosecution of Sexual Violence in Indian Country

Contrary to popular belief, the vast majority of rapists are serial offenders who are known to their victims. They are adept at creating, identifying, and exploiting perceived vulnerabilities in their victims, ultimately rendering them more vulnerable to attack through the use of premeditated tactics and non-traditional weapons. Further, rapists routinely benefit from society’s common misconceptions regarding their appearance, behavior, use of weapons, etc. that often results in a failure to identify, report, and hold them accountable for their crimes. To more effectively identify, investigate, and prosecute non-stranger rapists, prosecutors must overcome their own myths and misconceptions about sexual violence, as well as those believed by judges and juries.

The National Indian Country Training Initiative, in partnership with AEquitas: The Prosecutors’ Resource on Violence Against Women, is hosting the National Institute on the Prosecution of Sexual Violence in Indian Country (NIPSVIC), a 3 ½ day course designed to challenge participants to reevaluate their approach to prosecuting sexual violence crimes. The NIPSVIC will explore the complex issues faced by prosecutors in balancing offender accountability and the impact of criminal prosecution on victims.

In addition to practical case evaluation and litigation skills, the curriculum will examine the benefits of developing a coordinated, victim-centered community response; explain common injuries and relevant medical evidence, and offer guidance on the use of medical experts; explore ethical issues confronted by prosecutors; address the development and improvement of culturally-sensitive victim services; and offer prosecutors the ability to redefine outcomes and the very nature of justice in sexual violence cases. The NIPSVIC will offer hypothetical case problems, role-playing exercises, small group discussions, mini-lectures, and faculty demonstrations.

Rather than merely attending a series of legal lectures, participants will examine their current attitudes and practices by employing active case evaluation, preparation, and trial skills to respond to sexual violence in the varied contexts in which it occurs. The highly interactive format enables prosecutors from different jurisdictions, with varied levels of experience, to learn from one another and engage in “real-life” scenarios that are readily transferable to their everyday work.

Please copy and complete the form for each of your nominees and E-Mail it to the attention of Delores McCarter, Office of Legal Education. Nominations are due by November 10, 2016. The Office of Legal Education will review all nominations and will send an E-Mail advising nominees of their selection on or about November 21, 2016. Selected nominees will also receive travel and lodging information.

In order to ensure that our records are correct, please type in the required information when completing the nomination forms. Illegible and/or incomplete forms will not be considered.

Due to the increasing number of last minute cancellations we must ask that only nominations for those who are certain to attend be submitted.

The Executive Office for United States Attorneys will provide reasonable accommodations to people with disabilities. Requests should be made to Delores McCarter as early as possible, preferably at least two weeks in advance of the seminar. No nominee will be excluded from a course on the basis of a disability-related accommodations request.

This training is authorized under the Government Employees Training Act.

Any questions regarding this training seminar should be directed to Delores McCarter at (803) 705-5123.


Accessing Grants to Strengthen Justice System Capacity Workshop

The U.S. Department of Justice’s National Indian Country Training Initiative, together with the Bureau of Justice Assistance and the Office on Violence Against Women, is pleased to announce the Accessing Grants to Strengthen Justice System Capacity Workshop. This workshop will be held January 18-19, 2017, at the National Advocacy Center in Columbia, South Carolina. Travel and lodging accommodations will be provided by the Office of Legal Education.

In Fiscal Year 2010, the Department of Justice (Department) launched its Coordinated Tribal Assistance Solicitation (CTAS) in direct response to concerns raised by tribal leaders regarding the Department’s grant process and how it did not provide the flexibility tribes needed to address criminal justice and public safety needs in their communities. Through CTAS, federally-recognized tribes and tribal consortia were able, for the first time ever, to submit a single application for most of the Justice Department’s tribal grant programs. The Department designed this comprehensive approach to save time and resources and to allow tribes and the Department to gain a better understanding of the tribes’ overall public safety needs.

In Fiscal Year 2016, the department awarded 236 CTAS grants to 131 American Indian tribes, Alaska Native villages, tribal consortia and tribal designees. The grants provided more than $102 million to enhance law enforcement practices, and sustain crime prevention and intervention efforts in nine purpose areas including public safety and community policing, justice systems planning, alcohol and substance abuse, corrections and correctional alternatives, violence against women, juvenile justice, and tribal youth programs.

This workshop is designed to provide previous and new CTAS applicants with tools and guidance that may assist with the tribe’s efforts to access grant funding and other resources to improve their justice systems. Workshop sessions will be led by Department personnel and experienced technical assistance providers and will focus on topics such as: 1) strategic planning to support a strong program design; 2) writing a proposal; 3) grant writing tips; and 4) DOJ funding opportunities and training and technical assistance resources.

Please complete the form for each of your nominees and E-Mail it to the attention of Delores McCarter, Office of Legal Education. Nominations are due by November 28, 2016.  The NICTI will review all nominations and will send an e-mail advising nominees of their selection on or about December 5, 2016. Selected nominees will also receive information on how to book travel and lodging.

In order to ensure that our records are correct, please type in the required information when completing the nomination forms. Illegible and/or incomplete forms will not be considered.

Due to the increasing number of last minute cancellations, we must ask that only nominations for those who are certain to attend be submitted.

The Executive Office for United States Attorneys will provide reasonable accommodations to people with disabilities. Requests should be made to Delores McCarter as early as possible, preferably at least two weeks in advance of the seminar. No nominee will be excluded from a course on the basis of a disability-related accommodations request.

This training is authorized under the Government Employees Training Act.

Any questions regarding this training seminar should be directed to Delores McCarter at (803) 705-5123.


Tribal Mapping Resource Project

The Tribal Law and Policy Institute (TLPI), in conjunction with the National Congress of American Indians (NCAI), the National Center for Victims of Crime (NCVC) and the Office for Victims of Crime (OVC), are working on a Tribal Resource Mapping Project for AI/AN victims/survivors that will link AI/AN victims/survivors of crime and abuse to tribal victim services anywhere in the country and help identify gaps in the network of existing services.

Currently input from Alaska Natives in specialized areas of victim services are being sought. For more information about the resource mapping project or how you can help, visit http://www.victimsofcrime.org/our-programs/tribal-resource-mapping-project.


OVC is Recruiting Tribal Subject Matter Experts in Sex Trafficking

The Office for Victims of Crime (OVC) at the U.S. Department of Justice, is currently recruiting independent consultants and organizations with demonstrated knowledge of, and experience in, developing programs to provide direct services to American Indian and Alaska Native victims of sex trafficking. OVC is particularly interested in identifying individuals and organizations who have an expert level of knowledge of the dynamics of sex trafficking, including the complexities of the relationship between victims and traffickers, and the challenges of providing direct services to American Indian and Alaska Native victims, as well as a minimum of 5-7 years’ experience:

  • Providing trauma-informed services to American Indian and Alaska Native victims of sex trafficking, including building collaborative partnerships between tribal and non-tribal victim services organizations, law enforcement agencies, prosecutors, courts, healthcare providers, civil legal assistance providers, and social services organizations, in order to provide comprehensive and holistic services to victims;
  • Conducting community education and awareness activities that target both non-tribal professionals who are responsible for participating in the systemic response to sex trafficking, as well as American Indian and Alaska Native victims of sex trafficking;
  • Providing capacity-building training and technical assistance to tribal nonprofit organizations; and
  • Meeting the unique needs of urban American Indian and Alaska Native community members.

Subject matter experts who are identified as a result of this recruitment, may be added to OVC’s Training and Technical Assistance Center Consultant Network, and called upon to assist OVC with future projects. All interested individuals and organizations should submit a cover letter and resumes Kimberly Woodard, OVC’s Sr. Tribal Affairs Specialist, at kimberly.woodard@usdoj.gov, no later than August 15, 2016. If you have questions about this recruitment effort, please contact Kimberly either by email or by phone at (202) 307-2952.


OVW FY16 Sexual Assault Grants Now Available

OVW has released the RFP for the FY16 Tribal Sexual Assault Services Program, Sexual Assault Services Culturally Specific Program, and the Rural Sexual Assault, Domestic Violence, Dating Violence and Stalking Program.  To view the RFP and download the application package, click on the desired program and it will open a new window.

Competitions close February 1, 2016 (Rural) and February 2, 2016 (Tribal and Culturally Specific).


Strengthening Native American Communities and Economies

Strengthening Native American Communities and Economies

Application Deadline is Friday, January 15, 2016
Request for Proposals: Grants Available to Strengthen Capacity of Native Organizations and Tribal Programs That Serve the Field of Native American Arts and Artists

LONGMONT, Colorado (Nov. 30, 2015) — First Nations Development Institute (First Nations) today launched a Request for Proposals (RFP) for grants under its Native Arts Capacity-Building Initiative. First Nations will award up to six grants of up to $30,000 each to strengthen the organizational, managerial and programmatic capacity of Native American-controlled nonprofit organizations and tribal government programs that have existing efforts in place to serve the field of Native American arts and artists in tribal communities in four states – Minnesota, North Dakota, South Dakota and Wisconsin.

“As a cultural asset for Native communities, art has been an integral part of sustaining Native nations, cultures, languages and traditional beliefs, thereby shaping community and family ties and cultural pride,” noted First Nations President Michael E. Roberts. “We believe the continuing development of Native American art is an indispensable component of Native community economic development and the retention of Native cultures. Through direct grants and technical assistance and training under this initiative, we want to increase the organizational, managerial and programmatic capacity of selected direct-service Native organizations in an effort to enhance their long-term sustainability, stability, vibrancy and economic impact in their tribal communities.”
Applications are due by 5 p.m. Mountain Time on Friday, January 15, 2016. Eligible applicants must have existing program initiatives in place that emphasize strengthening the field of Native American arts and building the capacity of Native American artists in Minnesota, North Dakota, South Dakota and Wisconsin. All applicants must fully complete the First Nations online grant application, including the submission of all necessary attachments.

Types of eligible entities include but are not limited to:
• Federal- and State-Recognized Tribal Governments (Tribal Government Programs such as Tribal Arts Programs, Heritage Departments, Economic Development Departments, etc.)
• Reservation-Based and Select Non-Reservation-Based Native American Museums
• Tribal Cultural and Heritage Centers
• Tribal Colleges
• Native Community Development Financial Institutions (CDFIs)
• Native-Controlled 501(c)(3) Nonprofit Organizations
• Native 7871 Organizations
• Native Chambers of Commerce
For-profit organizations and individual artists are not eligible. First Nations does not require federal recognition for tribal governments to apply, but they must have state recognition. More information and the online grant application can be found here: http://www.firstnations.org/grantmaking/2016NACBI.

These grants will be the third annual awards of a three-year project. This First Nations initiative is made possible through generous funding from the Margaret A. Cargill Foundation of Eden Prairie, Minnesota.

About First Nations Development Institute
For 35 years, using a three-pronged strategy of educating grassroots practitioners, advocating for systemic change, and capitalizing Indian communities, First Nations has been working to restore Native American control and culturally-compatible stewardship of the assets they own – be they land, human potential, cultural heritage or natural resources – and to establish new assets for ensuring the long-term vitality of Native American communities. First Nations serves Native American communities throughout the United States. For more information, visit www.firstnations.org.

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PROGRAM CONTACT:
Catherine Bryan, First Nations Senior Program Officer
cbryan@firstnations.org or (303) 774-7836 x201

MEDIA CONTACT:
Randy Blauvelt, First Nations Senior Communications Officer
rblauvelt@firstnations.org or (303) 774-7836 x213

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